Media Ethics is independent and inclusive. It is editorially eclectic and neither its sponsors, its editor, or its staff are responsible for its content.  It strives to present and examine ideas, provide a forum for opinion and research articles on media ethics, as well as a venue for announcements and reviews of meetings, opportunities, and publications.  Media Ethics welcomes any and all contributions. All submitted manuscripts are subject to editing at the discretion of the editor.

 

Photographs and other illustrations often are digitally altered. Unless otherwise specified, authors and photographers retain all rights to their work, subject only to print and electronic publication by Media Ethics itself.

The Journalist's "Duty of Care" - to Other Journalists

s901ma1gThe Guardian / Ashley Wilbourn

JANE B. SINGER

points out the journalist's "duty of care" to bloggers and other journalists.

Ethicalia: A Compendium of Global Ethical Minutia

hj1urji8Manny ParaschosMANNY PARASCHOS

spans the globe for "Ethicalia," minutia about media ethics.

A Philosophy of Accountability for Journalism

wc28vuo0Lady Liberty / Ashley Wilbourn

THEODORE L. GLASSER AND JAMES S. ETTEMA

propose a philosophy of common sense accountability for journalism.

Teaching Ethics by Telling Stories

rxwqq3l6Ashley Wilbourn

HOWARD GOOD

speaks of teaching ethics by telling stories.

Seeking the Noumena in Journalistic Ethics

JOHN C. MERRILL7q32h37j

seeks the noumena.

Fame, Fortune and Ethics

p87l034uAshley WilbournROBERT R. SMITH

considers fame, fortune and ethics in telecommunications history.

Is Formula Journalism Good Journalism?

x42hs211Ashley WilbournCARLOE McNALL

decries formulaic journalism.

Operation West End: A Case Study in Media Ethics


615hw168Ashley WilbournRAMACHANDRA R. KOTHAPALLI

describes a case study.

Frey vs. Thoreau: Which Liar Tells More Truth?

9tkiaqw7Ashley WilbournDAVID EMBLIDGE

compares Frey and Thoreau

 
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